WISP Success is a Team Sport

by | Dec 18, 2018

WISP Success requires ideas and commitment from many.

Sure you’re an accomplished leader and much of your achievements were accomplished through your own vision, focus and by the sweat of your brow. But, even “self-made” moguls need a leg-up from wise teachers and dedicated staff to help them to reach the highest elevations. Steve Jobs was mentored by Bill Campbell and Jobs mentored Mark Zuckerberg.
Mentorship is a time-tested method to develop the skills required to get to where you want to go in all types of operations — including WISPs. 
And, as shown by Jobs it’s not a one-way street. Yes, you benefit from long-time WISP-ers experience; but, you should also be educating staff members and colleagues who are new to the industry. 
Here are the benefits of mentoring and being part of a mentoring relationship:

Create Your Own Think Tank

Face it, running a successful WISP doesn’t come with a blueprint for your unique service area, so there are times when trial and error is necessary. When you’re establishing backhaul links over challenging terrain, tricky software and hardware integrations or trouble-shooting complex network issues, you can’t just look up the resolution in a textbook.
If you can’t resolve network problems fast, you risk losing subscribers, profit and future growth opportunities.  When you have people to discuss your challenges, plans and ideas with, your think tank team can develop multiple scenarios and help uncover the solution that works best for the situation.
Think Tanks can fuel continued growth and WISP success.

Learn How to Give and Receive Feedback

As a leader, you must have confidence in your abilities. But, as a success-minded business person, you can’t allow that confidence to devolve into “ego” and stop you from moving your WISP forward.
Even humble leaders can get upset over negative feedback, no matter how well-intentioned.  By shutting down alternative suggestions without examining them, you miss out on suggestions that could save you thousands of dollars. Welcome and encourage feedback and develop an investigative approach to all viable ideas. 
And, when providing feedback, be sensitive so that the opinion is received as helpful rather than insulting or rejection. By taking part in a regular think tank, you can develop the sensibilities to give and receive feedback to advance your WISP.

Having Confidantes Reduce Stress

Running a WISP is stressful. It’s even more stressful when you have no one to confide in and all of the decisions rest on you. When this happens long-term, you could experience stress-related issues, like heartburn, headaches, emotional eating and drinking that could lead to greater health issues. 
When you have colleagues inside your organization and in the WISP community, you’re no longer alone and responsible for the direction of your enterprise. Even during difficult periods, your mentors and mentees not only lift your emotional burden but they turn the difficulty into a learning experience. 
WISP owners and operators don’t have to look very far for mentors. WISPA is a non-profit organization that aims to create an ecosystem to unify and develop the WISP industry.  Attending one of the two conferences that WISPA sponsors gives you time to network and develop your own mentors
You can find willing mentors on the social platform, WISP Talk. It’s a closed social group that is designed to advance understanding among WISPs about diverse topics, including technology, business and other matters. 
Vendors like Visp.net also support WISP mentorship. They host CEO Roundtable meetings with WISP operators and managers that use their software. The roundtable is a weekly discussion group, or think tank that examines WISP operations — from towers and installation to business processes — from an executive insider’s experience. The meeting is open to all Visp.net WISP clients and solution providers they choose to bring with them; call 541-955-6900 to reserve your spot. 
Learn more about the business strategies that create WISP success.
Thank you, Annie Spratt for providing the image used in this article. You can find the artist’s work at Unsplash.com.